Package Managers Integration

Running Maven Builds

JFrog CLI includes integration with Maven, allowing you to resolve dependencies and deploy build artifacts from and to Artifactory, while collecting build-info and storing it in Artifactory.

Setting maven repositories

Before using the jf mvn command, the project needs to be pre-configured with the Artifactory server and repositories, to be used for building and publishing the project. The jf mvn-config command should be used once to add the configuration to the project. The command should run while inside the root directory of the project. The configuration is stored by the command in the .jfrog directory at the root directory of the project.

Command-name

mvn-config

Abbreviation

mvnc

Command options:

--global

[Optional] Set to true, if you'd like the configuration to be global (for all projects on the machine). Specific projects can override the global configuration.

--server-id-resolve

[Optional] Server ID for resolution. The server should configured using the 'jf rt c' command.

--server-id-deploy

[Optional] Server ID for deployment. The server should be configured using the 'jf rt c' command.

--repo-resolve-releases

[Optional] Resolution repository for release dependencies.

--repo-resolve-snapshots

[Optional] Resolution repository for snapshot dependencies.

--repo-deploy-releases

[Optional] Deployment repository for release artifacts.

--repo-deploy-snapshots

[Optional] Deployment repository for snapshot artifacts.

--include-patterns

[Optional] Filter deployed artifacts by setting a wildcard pattern that specifies which artifacts to include. You may provide multiple comma-separated(,) patterns followed by a white-space. For example artifact-.jar, artifact-.pom

--exclude-patterns

[Optional] Filter deployed artifacts by setting a wildcard pattern that specifies which artifacts to exclude. You may provide multiple comma-separated(,) followed by a white-space. For example artifact--test.jar, artifact--test.pom

--scan

[Default: false] Set if you'd like all files to be scanned by Xray on the local file system prior to the upload, and skip the upload if any of the files are found vulnerable.

--format

[Default: table] Should be used with the --scan option. Defines the scan output format. Accepts table or json as values.

Command arguments:

The command accepts no arguments

Running maven

The mvn command triggers the maven client, while resolving dependencies and deploying artifacts from and to Artifactory.

Note: Before running the mvn command on a project for the first time, the project should be configured with the jf mvn-config command.

Note: If the machine running JFrog CLI has no access to the internet, make sure to read the Downloading the Maven and Gradle Extractor JARs section.

Commands Params

The following table lists the command arguments and flags:

Command-name

mvn

Abbreviation

mvn

Command options:

--threads

[Default: 3] Number of threads for uploading build artifacts.

--build-name

[Optional] Build name. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--build-number

[Optional] Build number. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--project

[Optional] JFrog project key.

--insecure-tls

[Default: false] Set to true to skip TLS certificates verification.

Command arguments:

The command accepts the same arguments and options as the mvn client.

Deploying Maven Artifacts

The deployment to Artifacts is triggered both by the deployment and install phases. To disable artifacts deployment, add** -Dartifactory.publish.artifacts=false to the list of goals and options. For example: "clean install**-Dartifactory.publish.artifacts=false"**

Example

Run clean and install with maven.

jf mvn clean install -f path/to/pom-file

Running Gradle Builds

JFrog CLI includes integration with Gradle, allowing you to resolve dependencies and deploy build artifacts from and to Artifactory, while collecting build-info and storing it in Artifactory.

Setting gradle repositories

Before using the gradle command, the project needs to be pre-configured with the Artifactory server and repositories, to be used for building and publishing the project. The gradle-config command should be used once to add the configuration to the project. The command should run while inside the root directory of the project. The configuration is stored by the command in the**.jfrog** directory at the root directory of the project.

Command-name

gradle-config

Abbreviation

gradlec

Command options:

--global

[Optional] Set to true, if you'd like the configuration to be global (for all projects on the machine). Specific projects can override the global configuration.

--server-id-resolve

[Optional] Server ID for resolution. The server should configured using the 'jf c add' command.

--server-id-deploy

[Optional] Server ID for deployment. The server should be configured using the 'jf c add' command.

--repo-resolve

[Optional] Repository for dependencies resolution.

--repo-deploy

[Optional] Repository for artifacts deployment.

--uses-plugin

[Default: false] Set to true if the Gradle Artifactory Plugin is already applied in the build script.

--use-wrapper

[Default: false] Set to true if you'd like to use the Gradle wrapper.

--deploy-maven-desc

[Default: true] Set to false if you do not wish to deploy Maven descriptors.

--deploy-ivy-desc

[Default: true] Set to false if you do not wish to deploy Ivy descriptors.

--ivy-desc-pattern

[Default: '[organization]/[module]/ivy-[revision].xml' Set the deployed Ivy descriptor pattern.

--ivy-artifacts-pattern

[Default: '[organization]/[module]/[revision]/[artifact]-revision.[ext]' Set the deployed Ivy artifacts pattern.

--scan

[Default: false] Set if you'd like all files to be scanned by Xray on the local file system prior to the upload, and skip the upload if any of the files are found vulnerable.

--format

[Default: table] Should be used with the --scan option. Defines the scan output format. Accepts table or json as values.

Command arguments:

The command accepts no arguments

Running gradle

The jf gradle command triggers the gradle client, while resolving dependencies and deploying artifacts from and to Artifactory.

Note: Before running the jf gradle command on a project for the first time, the project should be configured with the jf gradle-config command.

Note: If the machine running JFrog CLI has no access to the internet, make sure to read theDownloading the Maven and Gradle Extractor JARssection.

Commands Params

The following table lists the command arguments and flags:

Command-name

gradle

Abbreviation

gradle

Command options:

--threads

[Default: 3] Number of threads for uploading build artifacts.

--build-name

[Optional] Build name. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--build-number

[Optional] Build number. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--project

[Optional] JFrog project key.

Command arguments:

The command accepts the same arguments and options as the gradle client.

Example

Build the project using the artifactoryPublish task, while resolving and deploying artifacts from and to Artifactory.

jf gradle clean artifactoryPublish -b path/to/build.gradle

Downloading the Maven and Gradle Extractor JARs

For integrating with Maven and Gradle, JFrog CLI uses the build-info-extractor jars files. These jar files are downloaded by JFrog CLI from jcenter the first time they are needed.

If you're using JFrog CLI on a machine which has no access to the internet, you can configure JFrog CLI to download these jar files from an Artifactory instance. Here's how to configure Artifactory and JFrog CLI to download the jars files.

  1. Create a remote Maven repository in Artifactory and name it extractors. When creating the repository, configure it to proxy https://releases.jfrog.io/artifactory/oss-release-local

  2. Make sure that this Artifactory server is known to JFrog CLI, using the jf c show command. If not, configure it using the jf c add command.

  3. Set the JFROG_CLI_EXTRACTORS_REMOTE environment variable with the server ID of the Artifactory server you configured, followed by a slash, and then the name of the repository you created. For example my-rt-server/extractors

Running Builds with MSBuild

JFrog CLI includes integration with MSBuild and Artifactory, allowing you to resolve dependencies and deploy build artifacts from and to Artifactory, while collecting build-info and storing it in Artifactory. This is done by having JFrog CLI in your search path and adding JFrog CLI commands to the MSBuild csproj file.

For detailed instructions, please refer to our MSBuild Project Example on GitHub.

Managing Docker Images

JFrog CLI provides full support for pulling and publishing docker images from and to Artifactory using the docker client running on the same machine. This allows you to collect build-info for your docker build and then publish it to Artifactory. You can also promote the pushed docker images from one repository to another in Artifactory.

To build and push your docker images to Artifactory, follow these steps:

  1. Make sure Artifactory can be used as docker registry. Please refer to Getting Started with Docker and Artifactory in the JFrog Artifactory User Guide.

  2. Make sure that the installed docker client has version 17.07.0-ce (2017-08-29) or above. To verify this, run docker -v**

  3. To ensure that the docker client and your Artifactory docker registry are correctly configured to work together, run the following code snippet.

docker pull hello-world
docker tag hello-world:latest <artifactoryDockerRegistry>/hello-world:latest
docker login <artifactoryDockerRegistry>
docker push <artifactoryDockerRegistry>/hello-world:latest

If everything is configured correctly, pushing any image including the hello-world image should be successfully uploaded to Artifactory.

Note: When running the docker-pull and docker-push commands, the CLI will first attempt to log in to the docker registry. In case of a login failure, the command will not be executed.

Examples

Check out our docker project examples on GitHub.

Pulling Docker Images Using the Docker Client

Running jf docker pull command allows pulling docker images from Artifactory, while collecting the build-info and storing it locally, so that it can be later published to Artifactory, using the build-publish command.

Commands Params

The following table lists the command arguments and flags:

Command-name

docker pull

Abbreviation

dpl

Command options:

--server-id

[Optional] Server ID configured using the 'jf config' command. If not specified, the default configured Artifactory server is used.

--build-name

[Optional] Build name. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--build-number

[Optional] Build number. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--project

[Optional] JFrog project key.

--module

[Optional] Optional module name for the build-info.

--skip-login

[Default: false] Set to true if you'd like the command to skip performing docker login.

Command arguments:

The same arguments and options supported by the docker client/

Example

The subsequent command utilizes the docker client to pull the 'my-docker-registry.io/my-docker-image:latest' image from Artifactory. This operation logs the image layers as dependencies of the local build-info identified by the build name 'my-build-name' and build number '7'. This local build-info can subsequently be released to Artifactory using the command 'jf rt bp my-build-name 7'.

jf docker pull my-docker-registry.io/my-docker-image:latest --build-name=my-build-name --build-number=7

You can then publish the build-info collected by the jf docker pull command to Artifactory using the build-publish command.

Pushing Docker Images Using the Docker Client

After building your image using the docker client, the jf docker push command pushes the image layers to Artifactory, while collecting the build-info and storing it locally, so that it can be later published to Artifactory, using the jf rt build-publish command.

Commands Params

The following table lists the command arguments and flags:

Command-name

docker push

Abbreviation

dp

Command options:

--server-id

[Optional] Server ID configured using the 'jf config' command. If not specified, the default configured Artifactory server is used.

--build-name

[Optional] Build name. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--build-number

[Optional] Build number. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--project

[Optional] JFrog project key.

--module

[Optional] Optional module name for the build-info.

--skip-login

[Default: false] Set to true if you'd like the command to skip performing docker login.

--threads

[Default: 3] Number of working threads.

--detailed-summary

[Default: false] Set true to include a list of the affected files as part of the command output summary.

Command arguments:

The same arguments and options supported by the docker client/

Example

The subsequent command utilizes the docker client to push the 'my-docker-registry.io/my-docker-image:latest' image to Artifactory. This operation logs the image layers as artifacts of the local build-info identified by the build name 'my-build-name' and build number '7'. This local build-info can subsequently be released to Artifactory using the command 'jf rt bp my-build-name 7'.

jf docker push my-docker-registry.io/my-docker-image:latest --build-name=my-build-name --build-number=7

You can then publish the build-info collected by the docker-push command to Artifactory using the build-publish command.

Pulling Docker Images Using Podman

Podman is a daemon-less container engine for developing, managing, and running OCI Containers. Running the podman-pull command allows pulling docker images from Artifactory using podman, while collecting the build-info and storing it locally, so that it can be later published to Artifactory, using the build-publish command.

Commands Params

The following table lists the command arguments and flags:

Command-name

rt podman-pull

Abbreviation

rt ppl

Command options:

--server-id

[Optional] Server ID configured using the 'jf config' command. If not specified, the default configured Artifactory server is used.

--build-name

[Optional] Build name. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--build-number

[Optional] Build number. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--project

[Optional] JFrog project key.

--module

[Optional] Optional module name for the build-info.

--skip-login

[Default: false] Set to true if you'd like the command to skip performing docker login.

Command argument

Image tag

The docker image tag to pull.

Source repository

Source repository in Artifactory.

Example

In this example, podman is employed to pull the local image 'my-docker-registry.io/my-docker-image:latest' from the docker-local Artifactory repository. During this process, it registers the image layers as dependencies within a build-info identified by the build name 'my-build-name' and build number '7'. This build-info is initially established locally and must be subsequently published to Artifactory using the command 'jf rt build-publish my-build-name 7'.

jf rt podman-pull my-docker-registry.io/my-docker-image:latest docker-local --build-name my-build-name --build-number 7

You can then publish the build-info collected by the podman-pull command to Artifactory using the build-publish command.

Pushing Docker Images Using Podman

Podman is a daemon-less container engine for developing, managing, and running OCI Containers. After building your image, the podman-push command pushes the image layers to Artifactory, while collecting the build-info and storing it locally, so that it can be later published to Artifactory, using the build-publish command.

Commands Params

The following table lists the command arguments and flags:

Command-name

rt podman-push

Abbreviation

rt pp

Command options:

--server-id

[Optional] Server ID configured using the 'jf config' command. If not specified, the default configured Artifactory server is used.

--build-name

[Optional] Build name. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--build-number

[Optional] Build number. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--project

[Optional] JFrog project key.

--module

[Optional] Optional module name for the build-info.

--skip-login

[Default: false] Set to true if you'd like the command to skip performing docker login.

--threads

[Default: 3] Number of working threads.

--detailed-summary

[Default: false] Set to true to include a list of the affected files as part of the command output summary.

Command argument

Image tag

The docker image tag to push.

Target repository

Target repository in Artifactory.

Example

In this illustration, podman is employed to push the local image 'my-docker-registry.io/my-docker-image:latest' to the docker-local Artifactory repository. During this process, it registers the image layers as artifacts within a build-info identified by the build name 'my-build-name' and build number '7'. This build-info is initially established locally and must be subsequently published to Artifactory using the command 'jf rt build-publish my-build-name 7'.

jf rt podman-push my-docker-registry.io/my-docker-image:latest docker-local --build-name=my-build-name --build-number=7

You can then publish the build-info collected by the podman-push command to Artifactory using the build-publish command.

Pushing Docker Images Using Kaniko

JFrog CLI allows pushing containers to Artifactory using Kaniko, while collecting build-info and storing it in Artifactory. For detailed instructions, please refer to our Kaniko project example on GitHub.

Pushing Docker Images Using buildx

JFrog CLI allows pushing containers to Artifactory using buildx, while collecting build-info and storing it in Artifactory. For detailed instructions, please refer to our buildx project example on GitHub.

Pushing Docker Images Using the OpenShift CLI

JFrog CLI allows pushing containers to Artifactory using the OpenShift CLI, while collecting build-info and storing it in Artifactory. For detailed instructions, please refer to our OpenShift build project example on GitHub.

Adding Published Docker Images to the Build-Info

The build-docker-create command allows adding a docker image, which is already published to Artifactory, into the build-info. This build-info can be later published to Artifactory, using the build-publish command.

Commands Params

Command-name

rt build-docker-create

Abbreviation

rt bdc

Command options:

--image-file

Path to a file which includes one line in the following format: IMAGE-TAG@sha256:MANIFEST-SHA256. For example: cat image-file-details superfrog-docker.jfrog.io/hello-frog@sha256:30f04e684493fb5ccc030969df6de0

--server-id

[Optional] Server ID configured using the 'jf config' command. If not specified, the default configured Artifactory server is used.

--build-name

[Optional] Build name. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--build-number

[Optional] Build number. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--project

[Optional] JFrog project key.

--module

[Optional] Optional module name for the build-info.

--skip-login

[Default: false] Set to true if you'd like the command to skip performing docker login.

--threads

[Default: 3] Number of working threads.

Command argument

Target repository

The name of the repository to which the image was pushed.

Example

In this example, a Docker image that has already been deployed to Artifactory is incorporated into a locally created, unpublished build-info identified by the build name myBuild and build number '1'. This local build-info can subsequently be published to Artifactory using the command 'jf rt bp myBuild 1'.

jf rt bdc docker-local --image-file image-file-details --build-name myBuild --build-number 1

You can then publish the build-info collected by the podman-push command to Artifactory using the build-publish command.

Promoting Docker Images

Promotion is the action of moving or copying a group of artifacts from one repository to another, to support the artifacts' lifecycle. When it comes to docker images, there are two ways to promote a docker image which was pushed to Artifactory:

  1. Create build-info for the docker image, and then promote the build using the jf rt build-promote command.

  2. Use the jf rt docker-promote command as described below.

Commands Params

The following table lists the command arguments and flags:

Command-name

rt docker-promote

Abbreviation

rt dpr

Command options:

--server-id

[Optional] Server ID configured using the 'jf config' command. If not specified, the default configured Artifactory server is used.

--copy

[Default: false] If set true, the Docker image is copied to the target repository, otherwise it is moved.

--source-tag

[Optional] The tag name to promote.

--target-docker-image

[Optional] Docker target image name.

--target-tag

[Optional] The target tag to assign the image after promotion.

Command argument

source docker image

The docker image name to promote.

source repository

Source repository in Artifactory.

target repository

Target repository in Artifactory.

Examples

Promote the hello-world docker image from the docker-dev-local repository to the docker-staging-local repository.

jf rt docker-promote hello-world docker-dev-local docker-staging-local

Building Npm Packages Using the Npm Client

JFrog CLI provides full support for building npm packages using the npm client. This allows you to resolve npm dependencies, and publish your npm packages from and to Artifactory, while collecting build-info and storing it in Artifactory.

Follow these guidelines when building npm packages:

  • You can download npm packages from any npm repository type - local, remote or virtual, but you can only publish to a local or virtual Artifactory repository, containing local repositories. To publish to a virtual repository, you first need to set a default local repository. For more details, please refer to Deploying to a Virtual Repository.

  • When the npm-publish command runs, JFrog CLI runs the pack command in the background. The pack action is followed by an upload, which is not based on the npm client's publish command. Therefore, If your npm package includes the prepublish or postpublish scripts, rename them to prepack and postpack respectively.

Requirements

Npm client version 5.4.0 and above.

Artifactory version 5.5.2 and above.

Setting npm repositories

Before using the jf npm install, jf npm ci and jf npm publish commands, the project needs to be pre-configured with the Artifactory server and repositories, to be used for building and publishing the project. The jf npm-config command should be used once to add the configuration to the project. The command should run while inside the root directory of the project. The configuration is stored by the command in the .jfrog directory at the root directory of the project.

Command-name

npm-config

Abbreviation

npmc

Command options:

--global

[Optional] Set to true, if you'd like the configuration to be global (for all projects on the machine). Specific projects can override the global configuration.

--server-id-resolve

[Optional] Artifactory server ID for resolution. The server should configured using the 'jf c add' command.

--server-id-deploy

[Optional] Artifactory server ID for deployment. The server should be configured using the 'jf c add' command.

--repo-resolve

[Optional] Repository for dependencies resolution.

--repo-deploy

[Optional] Repository for artifacts deployment.

Command arguments:

The command accepts no arguments

Installing Npm Packages

The jf npm install and jf npm ci commands execute npm's install and ci commands respectively, to fetches the npm dependencies from the npm repositories.

Before running the jf npm install or jf npm ci command on a project for the first time, the project should be configured using the jf npm-config command.

Commands Params

The following table lists the command arguments and flags:

Command-name

npm

Abbreviation

Command options:

--build-name

[Optional] Build name. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--build-number

[Optional] Build number. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--project

[Optional] JFrog project key.

--module

[Optional] Optional module name for the build-info.

--threads

[Default: 3] Number of working threads for build-info collection.

Command arguments:

The command accepts the same arguments and options as the npm client.

--project

[Optional] JFrog project key.

--module

[Optional] Optional module name for the build-info.

Command arguments:

The command accepts the same arguments and options as the npm client.

Examples

Example 1

The following example installs the dependencies and records them locally as part of build my-build-name/1. The build-info can later be published to Artifactory using the build-publish command. The dependencies are resolved from the Artifactory server and repository configured by npm-config command.

jf npm install --build-name=my-build-name --build-number=1

Example 2

The following example installs the dependencies. The dependencies are resolved from the Artifactory server and repository configured by npm-config command.

jf npm install

Example 3

The following example installs the dependencies using the npm-ci command. The dependencies are resolved from the Artifactory server and repository configured by npm-config command.

jf npm ci

Publishing the Npm Packages into Artifactory

The npm-publish command packs and deploys the npm package to the designated npm repository.

Before running the npm-publish command on a project for the first time, the project should be configured using the jf npm-config command. This configuration includes the Artifactory server and repository to which the package should deploy.

Warning: If your npm package includes the prepublish or postpublish scripts, please refer to the guidelines above.

Commands Params

The following table lists the command arguments and flags:

Command-name

npm publish

Abbreviation

Command options:

--build-name

[Optional] Build name. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--build-number

[Optional] Build number. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--project

[Optional] JFrog project key.

--module

[Optional] Optional module name for the build-info.

--detailed-summary

[Default: false] Set true to include a list of the affected files as part of the command output summary.

--scan

[Default: false] Set if you'd like all files to be scanned by Xray on the local file system prior to the upload, and skip the upload if any of the files are found vulnerable.

--format

[Default: table] Should be used with the --scan option. Defines the scan output format. Accepts table or JSON as values.

Command argument

The command accepts the same arguments and options that the npm pack command expects.

Example

To pack and publish the npm package and also record it locally as part of build my-build-name/1, run the following command. The build-info can later be published to Artifactory using the build-publish command. The package is published to the Artifactory server and repository configured by npm-config command.

jf npm publish --build-name=my-build-name --build-number=1

Building Npm Packages Using the Yarn Client

JFrog CLI provides full support for building npm packages using the yarn client. This allows you to resolve npm dependencies, while collecting build-info and storing it in Artifactory. You can download npm packages from any npm repository type - local, remote or virtual. Publishing the packages to a local npm repository is supported through the jf rt upload command.

Yarn version 2.4.0 and above is supported.

Setting npm repositories

Before using the jf yarn command, the project needs to be pre-configured with the Artifactory server and repositories, to be used for building the project. The yarn-config command should be used once to add the configuration to the project. The command should run while inside the root directory of the project. The configuration is stored by the command in the .jfrog directory at the root directory of the project.

Command-name

yarn-config

Abbreviation

yarnc

Command options:

--global

[Optional] Set to true, if you'd like the configuration to be global (for all projects on the machine). Specific projects can override the global configuration.

--server-id-resolve

[Optional] Artifactory server ID for resolution. The server should configured using the 'jf c add' command.

--repo-resolve

[Optional] Repository for dependencies resolution.

Command arguments:

The command accepts no arguments

Installing Npm Packages

The jf yarn command executes the yarn client, to fetch the npm dependencies from the npm repositories.

Note: Before running the command on a project for the first time, the project should be configured using the jf yarn-config command.

Commands Params

The following table lists the command arguments and flags:

Command-name

yarn

Command options:

--build-name

[Optional] Build name. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--build-number

[Optional] Build number. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--project

[Optional] JFrog project key.

--module

[Optional] Optional module name for the build-info.

--threads

[Default: 3] Number of working threads for build-info collection.

Command arguments:

The command accepts the same arguments and options as the yarn client.

Examples

Example 1

The following example installs the dependencies and records them locally as part of build my-build-name/1. The build-info can later be published to Artifactory using the build-publish command. The dependencies are resolved from the Artifactory server and repository configured by **yarn-config command.

jf yarn install --build-name=my-build-name --build-number=1

Example 2

The following example installs the dependencies. The dependencies are resolved from the Artifactory server and repository configured by jf yarn-config command.

jf yarn install

Building Go Packages

General

JFrog CLI provides full support for building Go packages using the Go client. This allows resolving Go dependencies from and publish your Go packages to Artifactory, while collecting build-info and storing it in Artifactory.

Requirements

JFrog CLI client version 1.20.0 and above.

Artifactory version 6.1.0 and above.

Go client version 1.11.0 and above.

Example project

To help you get started, you can use this sample project on GitHub.

Setting Go repositories

Before you can use JFrog CLI to build your Go projects with Artifactory, you first need to set the resolutions and deployment repositories for the project.

Here's how you set the repositories.

  1. 'cd' into to the root of the Go project.

  2. Run the jf go-config command.

Commands Params

Command-name

go-config

Abbreviation

Command options:

--global

[Default false] Set to true, if you'd like the configuration to be global (for all projects on the machine). Specific projects can override the global configuration.

--server-id-resolve

[Optional] Artifactory server ID for resolution. The server should configured using the 'jf c add' command.

--server-id-deploy

[Optional] Artifactory server ID for deployment. The server should be configured using the 'jf c add' command.

--repo-resolve

[Optional] Repository for dependencies resolution.

--repo-deploy

[Optional] Repository for artifacts deployment.

Examples

Example 1

Set repositories for this go project.

jf go-config

Example 2

Set repositories for all go projects on this machine.

jf go-config --global

Running Go commands

The go command triggers the go client.

Note: Before running the go command on a project for the first time, the project should be configured using the jf go-config command.

Commands Params

The following table lists the command arguments and flags:

Command-name

go

Abbreviation

go

Command options:

--build-name

[Optional] Build name. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--build-number

[Optional] Build number. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--project

[Optional] JFrog project key.

--no-fallback

[Default false] Set to avoid downloading packages from the VCS, if they are missing in Artifactory.

--module

[Optional] Optional module name for the build-info.

Command arguments:

Go command

The command accepts the same arguments and options as the go client.

Examples

Example 1

The following example runs Go build command. The dependencies resolved from Artifactory via the go-virtual repository.

Note: Before using this example, please make sure to set repositories for the Go project using the go-config command.

jf go build

Example 2

The following example runs Go build command, while recording the build-info locally under build name my-build and build number 1. The build-info can later be published to Artifactory using the build-publishcommand.

Note: Before using this example, please make sure to set repositories for the Go project using the go-config command.

jf rt go build --build-name=my-build --build-number=1

Publishing Go Packages to Artifactory

The jf go-publish command packs and deploys the Go package to the designated Go repository in Artifactory.

Note: Before running the jf go-publish command on a project for the first time, the project should be configured using the jf go-config command.

Commands Params

The following table lists the command arguments and flags:

Command-name

go-publish

Abbreviation

gp

Command options:

--build-name

[Optional] Build name. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--build-number

[Optional] Build number. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--project

[Optional] JFrog project key.

--module

[Optional] Optional module name for the build-info.

--detailed-summary

[Default: false] Set true to include a list of the affected files as part of the command output summary.

Command argument

Version

The version of the Go project that is being published

Examples

Example 1

To pack and publish the Go package, run the following command. Before running this command on a project for the first time, the project should be configured using the jf go-config command.

jf gp v1.2.3 

Example 2

To pack and publish the Go package and also record the build-info as part of build my-build-name/1 , run the following command. The build-info can later be published to Artifactory using the build-publish command. Before running this command on a project for the first time, the project should be configured using the jf go-config command.

jf gp v1.2.3 --build-name my-build-name --build-number 1

Building Python Packages

JFrog CLI provides full support for building Python packages using the pip and pipenv and poetry package installers. This allows resolving python dependencies from Artifactory, while (for pip and pipenv) recording the downloaded packages. The downloaded packages are stored as dependencies in the build-info stored in Artifactory.

Once the packages are installed, the Python project can be then built and packaged using the pip, pipenv or poetry clients. Once built, the produced artifacts can be uploaded to Artifactory using JFrog CLI's upload command and registered as artifacts in the build-info.

Example projects

To help you get started, you can use the sample projects on GitHub.

Setting Python repository

Before you can use JFrog CLI to build your Python projects with Artifactory, you first need to set the repository for the project.

Here's how you set the repositories.

  1. 'cd' into the root of the Python project.

  2. Run the jf pip-config, jf pipenv-config or jf poetry-config commands, depending on whether you're using the pip, pipenv or poetry clients.

Commands Params

Command-name

pip-config / pipenv-config / poetry-config

Abbreviation

pipc / pipec / poc

Command options:

--global

[Default false] Set to true, if you'd like the configuration to be global (for all projects on the machine). Specific projects can override the global configuration.

--server-id-resolve

[Optional] Artifactory server ID for resolution. The server should configured using the 'jf c add' command.

--repo-resolve

[Optional] Repository for dependencies resolution.

Examples

Example 1

Set repositories for this Python project when using the pip client.

jf pipc

Example 2

Set repositories for all Python projects using the pip client on this machine.

jf pipc --global

Example 3

Set repositories for this Python project when using the pipenv client.

jf pipec

Example 4

Set repositories for all Python projects using the poetry client on this machine.

jf poc --global

Example 5

Set repositories for this Python project when using the poetry client.

jf poc

Example 6

Set repositories for all Python projects using the pipenv client on this machine.

jf pipec --global

Installing Python packages

The jf pip install, jf pipenv install and jf poetry install commands use the pip, pipenv and poetry clients respectively, to install the project dependencies from Artifactory. The jf pip install and jf pipenv install commands can also record these packages as build dependencies as part of the build-info published to Artifactory.

Note: Before running the pip install, pipenv install and poetry install commands on a project for the first time, the project should be configured using the jf pip-config ,jf pipenv-config or jf poetry-config commands respectively.

Recording all dependencies - currently available for pip and pipenv.

JFrog CLI records the installed packages as build-info dependencies. The recorded dependencies are packages installed during the jf pip install and jf pipenv install command execution. When running the command inside a Python environment, which already has some of the packages installed, the installed packages will not be included as part of the build-info, because they were not originally installed by JFrog CLI. A warning message will be added to the log in this case.

How to include all packages in the build-info?

The details of all the installed packages are always cached by the jf pip install and jf pipenv install command in the .jfrog/projects/deps.cache.json file, located under the root of the project. JFrog CLI uses this cache for including previously installed packages in the build-info. If the Python environment had some packages installed prior to the first execution of the install command, those previously installed packages will be missing from the cache and therefore will not be included in the build-info.

Running the install command with both the no-cache-dir and force-reinstall pip options, should re-download and install these packages, and they will therefore be included in the build-info and added to the cache. It is also recommended to run the command from inside a virtual environment.

Commands Params

Command-name

pip / pipenv / poetry

Abbreviation

Command options:

--build-name

[Optional] Build name. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--build-number

[Optional] Build number. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--project

[Optional] JFrog project key.

--module

[Optional] Optional module name for the build-info.

Command argument

The command accepts the same arguments and options as the pip / pipenv / poetry clients.

Examples

Example 1

The following command triggers pip install, while recording the build dependencies as part of build name my-build and build number 1 .

jf pip install . --build-name my-build --build-number 1

Example 2

The following command triggers pipenv install, while recording the build dependencies as part of build name my-build and build number 1 .

jf pipenv install . --build-name my-build --build-number 1

Example 3

The following are command triggers poetry install, while recording the build dependencies as part of build name my-build and build number 1 .

jf poetry install . --build-name my-build --build-number 1

Building NuGet Packages

JFrog CLI provides full support for restoring NuGet packages using the NuGet client or the .NET Core CLI. This allows you to resolve NuGet dependencies from and publish your NuGet packages to Artifactory, while collecting build-info and storing it in Artifactory.

NuGet dependencies resolution is supported by the jf nuget command, which uses the NuGet client or the jf dotnet command, which uses the .NET Core CLI.

To publish your NuGet packages to Artifactory, use the jf rt upload command.

Setting NuGet repositories

Before using thenuget or dotnet commands, the project needs to be pre-configured with the Artifactory server and repository, to be used for building the project.

Before using the nuget or dotnet commands, the nuget-config or dotnet-config commands should be used respectively. These commands configure the project with the details of the Artifactory server and repository, to be used for the build. The nuget-config or dotnet-config commands should be executed while inside the root directory of the project. The configuration is stored by the command in the .jfrog directory at the root directory of the project. You then have the option of storing the .jfrog directory with the project sources, or creating this configuration after the sources are checked out.

The following table lists the commands' options:

Command-name

nuget-config / dotnet-config

Abbreviation

nugetc / dotnetc

Command options:

--global

[Optional] Set to true, if you'd like the configuration to be global (for all projects on the machine). Specific projects can override the global configuration.

--server-id-resolve

[Optional] Artifactory server ID for resolution. The server should configured using the 'jf c add' command.

--repo-resolve

[Optional] Repository for dependencies resolution.

--nuget-v2

[Default: false] Set to true if you'd like to use the NuGet V2 protocol when restoring packages from Artifactory (instead of NuGet V3).

Command arguments:

The command accepts no arguments

Running Nuget and Dotnet commands

The nuget command runs the NuGet client and the dotnet command runs the **.NET Core CLI.

Before running the nuget command on a project for the first time, the project should be configured using the nuget-config command.

Before running the dotnet command on a project for the first time, the project should be configured using the dotnet-config command.

Commands Params

The following table lists the commands arguments and options:

Command-name

nuget / dotnet

Abbreviation

Command options:

--build-name

[Optional] Build name. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--build-number

[Optional] Build number. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--project

[Optional] JFrog project key.

--module

[Optional] Optional module name for the build-info.

Command argument

The command accepts the same arguments and options as the NuGet client / .NET Core CLI.

Examples

Example 1

Run nuget restore for the solution at the current directory, while resolving the NuGet dependencies from the pre-configured Artifactory repository. Use the NuGet client for this command

jf nuget restore

Example 2

Run dotnet restore for the solution at the current directory, while resolving the NuGet dependencies from the pre-configured Artifactory repository. Use the .NET Core CLI for this command

jf dotnet restore

Example 3

Run dotnet restore for the solution at the current directory, while resolving the NuGet dependencies from the pre-configured Artifactory repository.

jf dotnet restore --build-name=my-build-name --build-number=1

In addition, record the build-info as part of build my-build-name/1. The build-info can later be published to Artifactory using the build-publish command.

Packaging and Publishing Terraform Modules

JFrog CLI supports packaging Terraform modules and publishing them to a Terraform repository in Artifactory using the jf terraform publish command.

We recommend using this example project on GitHub for an easy start up.

Before using the jf terraform publish command for the first time, you first need to configure the Terraform repository for your Terraform project. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. 'cd' into the root directory for your Terraform project.

  2. Run the interactive jf terraform-config command and set deployment repository name.

terraform-config

The jf terraform-config command will store the repository name inside the .jfrog directory located in the current directory. You can also add the --global command option, if you prefer the repository configuration applies to all projects on the machine. In that case, the configuration will be saved in JFrog CLI's home directory.

Commands Params

The following table lists the command options:

Command-name

terraform-config

Abbreviation

tfc

Command options:

--global

[Optional] Set to true, if you'd like the configuration to be global (for all projects on the machine). Specific projects can override the global configuration.

--server-id-deploy

[Optional] Artifactory server ID for deployment. The server should configured using the 'jf c add' command.

--repo-deploy

[Optional] Repository for artifacts deployment.

Command arguments:

The command accepts no arguments

Examples

Example 1

Configuring the Terraform repository for a project, while inside the root directory of the project

jf tfc

Example 2

Configuring the Terraform repository for all projects on the machine

jf tfc --global

terraform publish

The terraform publish command creates a terraform package for the module in the current directory, and publishes it to the configured Terraform repository in Artifactory.

Commands Params

The following table lists the commands arguments and options:

Command-name

terraform publish

Abbreviation

tf p

Command options:

--namespace

[Mandatory] Terraform module namespace

--provider

[Mandatory] Terraform module provider

--tag

[Mandatory] Terraform module tag

--exclusions

[Optional] A list of semicolon-separated(;) exclude patterns wildcards. Paths inside the module matching one of the patterns are excluded from the deployed package.

--build-name

[Optional] Build name. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--build-number

[Optional] Build number. For more details, please refer to Build Integration.

--project

Command argument

The command accepts no arguments

Examples

Example 1

The command creates a package for the Terraform module in the current directory, and publishes it to the Terraform repository (configured by the jf tfc command) with the provides namespace, provider and tag.

jf tf p --namespace example --provider aws --tag v0.0.1

Example 2

The command creates a package for the Terraform module in the current directory, and publishes it to the Terraform repository (configured by the jf tfc command) with the provides namespace, provider and tag. The published package will not include the module paths which include either test or ignore .

jf tf p --namespace example --provider aws --tag v0.0.1 --exclusions "\*test\*;\*ignore\*"

Example 3

The command creates a package for the Terraform module in the current directory, and publishes it to the Terraform repository (configured by the jf tfc command) with the provides namespace, provider and tag. The published module will be recorded as an artifact of a build named my-build with build number 1. The jf rt bp command publishes the build to Artifactory.

jf tf p --namespace example --provider aws --tag v0.0.1 --build-name my-build --build-number 1
jf rt bp my-build 1

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